Physicians’ Legal Obligation to Report to the State Medical Board of Ohio

Last week, the State Medical Board of Ohio issued a landmark decision in which the Medical Board permanently revoked the license of a physician for failing to report to the Medical Board allegations of sexual misconduct concerning the physician’s colleague.

Pursuant to ORC 4732.224(B), an individual licensed by the Medical Board who has reason to believe that a violation of any provision of the Medical Board’s statutes or rules has occurred shall report to the Medical Board. Although this law has been in effect for many years, this was the first time we are aware that the Medical Board has disciplined a licensee for failing to report a licensee under this law. It was also remarkable that the sanction imposed was a permanent revocation, which is the most serious sanction that can be imposed by the Medical Board.

An interesting factor of this case also rests in the subjective wording of the reporting statute, which provides that a licensee who “has reason to believe” that a violation of Medical Board law or rule has occurred shall report to the Medical Board. This subjective wording can make it difficult for a physician to know when they must report to the Medical Board allegations made against a colleague.  However, OAC 4731-15-01(D) provides guidance by indicating that “reason to believe” or “a belief” does not require absolute certainty or complete unquestioning acceptance, but only an opinion that a violation has occurred based upon firsthand knowledge or reliable information.

In this case, the Board’s attorneys argued that the physician’s failure to report to the Medical Board allegations of sexual misconduct concerning the physician’s medical partner with patients in the practice was a violation of the reporting statute. Despite the fact that the physician who allegedly engaged in misconduct was terminated from employment at the medical practice, the physician who failed to report to the Medical Board the alleged misconduct permanently lost his medical license.

Although there are certain exceptions to the reporting requirement in OAC 4731-15-01(B), those exceptions are limited and require a fact specific analysis in each individual case.

Under OAC 4731-15-01(E), a report required to be made must be made to the Medical Board within 48 hours. Under OAC 4731-15-01(G), each report must include (i) the name of the practitioner or other individual in violation, (ii) the violation which is believed to have occurred, and (iii) the date(s) of and place(s) of occurrence(s), if known.

This case is a cautionary tale to Ohio physicians. If you have reason to believe that another licensed professional is violating any of the provisions of the Ohio Medical Practice Act (ORC 4731 et seq and OAC 4731 et seq), you are required to report to the Medical Board.

As always, if you have any questions about this post or about the State Medical Board of Ohio in general, please feel free to call one of the attorneys at the Collis Law Group LLC at 614-486-3909 or email me at beth@collislaw.com

 

 

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