Ohio Physicians…Emeritus registration is an honorable and practical status following your retirement from the practice of medicine in Ohio.

Many physicians struggle with retirement. Many physicians envision practicing medicine until the day they die because they view medicine not only as their job, but as their way of life, identity, and calling.

I am aware of physicians who have lived outside Ohio or have not practiced in Ohio for many years who nevertheless continue to maintain an active Ohio medical license. However, to maintain an active medical license in Ohio, a physician must keep up to date with costly continuing education hours and renewals, and other legal and administrative requirements, the failure of any of which to adhere to could subject the physician to costly and stressful investigation and/or discipline by the State Medical Board of Ohio (“Board”). Additionally, even if a physician voluntarily allows their Ohio medical license to expire or lapse, the Board retains the legal right to institute a disciplinary action against the physician’s Ohio medical license for violation of certain laws or rules.

There is a simple way to avoid these problems. Under Board administrative rule 4731-22, a physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery in Ohio for at least ten years who declares that he or she is retired from active practice may apply to the Board for emeritus registration. For purposes of emeritus registration, “retired” is a status that means an individual has no active license in another state, or agrees in the emeritus application that he or she will not apply for renewal or reinstatement of any license held in another state. The physician may apply for emeritus registration by indicating on his or her biennial registration form or in written correspondence to the Board if he or she is in fact retired from active practice of medicine and surgery. To be eligible for emeritus status, the physician must also not have been the subject of disciplinary action in Ohio resulting in the revocation, suspension, probation, reprimand, or any other limitation of the physician’s license to practice.

Emeritus registration is not a license to engage in the practice of medicine and surgery and emeritus registrants may not engage in, or hold themselves out to others as actively engaged in, the practice of medicine and surgery. However, emeritus registrants may refer to themselves as doctor, if previously licensed to practice medicine and surgery.

Additionally, emeritus registrants are not required to comply with the Board’s continuing education requirements and also are exempt from renewal and renewal fees.

An emeritus registrant may apply to change back to active practice under conditions specified in the Board’s rules.

Emeritus registration is also available for practitioners licensed to practice osteopathic medicine and surgery, podiatric medicine and surgery, massage therapy, or cosmetic therapy in Ohio.

Be proactive. If you are ready to retire from the active practice of medicine and surgery in Ohio, consider applying for emeritus registration. Emeritus registration offers an honorable and practical status for a physician retiring from the active practice of medicine and surgery.

As always, if you have any questions about this post or the State Medical Board of Ohio in general, please feel free to contact me at Beth@collislaw.com or 614-486-3909 or check out our firm website at www.collislaw.com.

State Medical Board of Ohio Monthly Disciplinary Meeting: No Holds Barred!

On the second Wednesday of each month, the State Medical Board of Ohio holds its monthly Board meeting. At these public meetings, the Medical Board reviews and determines all matters related to scope of practice, licensure and discipline.  Yesterday, I attended the Board’s October Board meeting.

In many respects, the October meeting was no different from other meetings. The Board members reviewed the scope of practice for Physician’s Assistants, ruled on licensure applications, and most importantly for the clients that our firm represent, the Medical Board made final determinations in disciplinary matters.

I was struck by the level of detail and care that each Board member took in reviewing the disciplinary matters. I am always appreciative to learn that the Board Members have read the Report and Recommendation of the disciplinary hearings, reviewed all the exhibits, and carefully consider each case.

It is also refreshing to see Board Members challenge each other and actively deliberate before issuing a discipline. The Board Members do not hold back in their questions, concerns or comments while deliberating the sanction that should be imposed in a given case. They also do not simply “rubber stamp” the recommendation of the hearing examiner in a disciplinary case.

Many believe that all deliberations of Board Members should be behind closed doors. I disagree. If a licensee is subject to discipline by the Medical Board, the licensee should be provided with the opportunity to present their defense and listen to the questions and concerns of the Board Members before a sanction, if any, is imposed.

The monthly Board meeting minutes are online and can be reviewed by the public. http://med.ohio.gov/ForthePublic/BoardMeetingMinutes.aspx

I highly encourage all licensees to read the monthly Board minutes. The minutes show WHAT types of cases are of concern to the Board and what Discipline is typically imposed. I make it a point to attend every Board meeting and to read the monthly Board minutes.

As always, if you have any questions about the State Medical Board of Ohio or this post, please feel free to contact me at 614-486-3909 or email me at beth@collislaw.com.